Steinberg, William

William Steinberg (Cologne, August 1, 1899 – New York City, May 16, 1978) was a German-American conductor. Toscanini and Klemperer were Steinberg’s two mentors. He adopted their clear, faithful approach to the classic scores and, like Klemperer, lost much of his early interest in modern music. Steinberg guest conducted regularly during his tenure with the NBC Symphony Orchestra. In 1945 he became Music Director of the Buffalo (New York) Philharmonic Orchestra. In 1952 he obtained the major appointment of his career, as music director of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. He restored that orchestra to an artistic high point. Concurrently, he was musical director of the London Philharmonic Orchestra (1958 – 1960). In 1960 he scored a great success guest conducting the Boston Symphony Orchestra and was the preferred choice of its board for their next music director, as Charles Münch was stepping down from the position. However, RCA, the orchestra’s record company, successfully pressured them to appoint Erich Leinsdorf, already on their roster of conductors. After Leinsdorf’s tenure ended, they did appoint Steinberg to the post effective 1969.

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William Steinberg (Cologne, August 1, 1899 – New York City, May 16, 1978) was a German-American conductor. Toscanini and Klemperer were Steinberg’s two mentors. He adopted their clear, faithful approach to the classic scores and, like Klemperer, lost much of his early interest in modern music. Steinberg guest conducted regularly during his tenure with the NBC Symphony Orchestra. In 1945 he became Music Director of the Buffalo (New York) Philharmonic Orchestra. In 1952 he obtained the major appointment of his career, as music director of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. He restored that orchestra to an artistic high point. Concurrently, he was musical director of the London Philharmonic Orchestra (1958 – 1960). In 1960 he scored a great success guest conducting the Boston Symphony Orchestra and was the preferred choice of its board for their next music director, as Charles Münch was stepping down from the position. However, RCA, the orchestra’s record company, successfully pressured them to appoint Erich Leinsdorf, already on their roster of conductors. After Leinsdorf’s tenure ended, they did appoint Steinberg to the post effective 1969.

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